caille:

Portraits in the Mission district of San Francisco in the 1970s by Joe Ramos. Check out more here.

(Source: orangeis)

Museums have exacerbated this cult of celebrity through an emphasis on blockbuster exhibitions and traveling shows that “package” the greatest hits into must-see moments. We push the once-in-a-lifetime experience of seeing the art. And then the crowds show up. They were told they must not miss it. They had better capture the moment however they can! And so the crowds shuffle through, cameras dutifully in hand. The art gets captured like a lame animal in a game park, instead of the wild thing it is.
hyperallergic:

(via The Human Face of a WWII Tragedy, in Full Color)
LOS ANGELES — In August 1942, thousands of Japanese Americans from Los Angeles began their lives as prisoners on a wide stretch of prairie in northwestern Wyoming. Among those forcibly relocated to Heart Mountain concentration camp was a photographer and auto mechanic from Hollywood named Bill Manbo, whose Kodachrome color photographs are the subject of the Japanese American National Museum’s Colors of Confinement.
READ MORE

hyperallergic:

(via The Human Face of a WWII Tragedy, in Full Color)

LOS ANGELES — In August 1942, thousands of Japanese Americans from Los Angeles began their lives as prisoners on a wide stretch of prairie in northwestern Wyoming. Among those forcibly relocated to Heart Mountain concentration camp was a photographer and auto mechanic from Hollywood named Bill Manbo, whose Kodachrome color photographs are the subject of the Japanese American National Museum’s Colors of Confinement.

READ MORE

Some 600,000 Americans—2.5 percent of the American population—died in the Civil War. What came before this was a long bloody war—enslavement—against black families, black communities and black bodies. What came after was a terrorist regime which ruled an entire swath of this country by fire and rope. That regime was not overthrown until an era well within the living memory of many Americans. Taken all together, the body count that led us to our present tenuous democratic moment does not elevate us above the community of nations, but installs us uncomfortably within its ranks.
eastmanhouse:

Léon Vidal, French, 1833 - 1906




Leon Vidal’s exact process remains an elusive one. Here is a possible formula, based on some inspection by Paul Thirkell and Stephen Hoskins from the Center for Fine Print Research, Bristol U.K. in 2003:First, a coating of lithographic varnish is layed down, followed by dusting with gold powder. Lithographic colors are then printed from plates, as many as 7 or 8 printings. This is then followed by a woodburtytype overlay, but there is a possibility that this last layer may be a carbon transfer with a varnish layer on top."THE ARTISTIC TREASURES OF FRANCE" PHOTOCHROMES FROM, 1883

eastmanhouse:

Léon Vidal, French, 1833 - 1906
Leon Vidal’s exact process remains an elusive one. Here is a possible formula, based on some inspection by Paul Thirkell and Stephen Hoskins from the Center for Fine Print Research, Bristol U.K. in 2003:
First, a coating of lithographic varnish is layed down, followed by dusting with gold powder. Lithographic colors are then printed from plates, as many as 7 or 8 printings. This is then followed by a woodburtytype overlay, but there is a possibility that this last layer may be a carbon transfer with a varnish layer on top.

"THE ARTISTIC TREASURES OF FRANCE" PHOTOCHROMES FROM, 1883

One of my childhood memories of the zoo was how the animals were always hiding.* That’s thankfully no longer the case today. The animals were all out, and quite often lively and healthy looking.

(via San Francisco Zoo | n j w v)

I found myself looking a lot at the old infrastructure this time. Both because as my kids get older, I find myself trying to remember how the zoo was when I used to visit it at their age, and because I enjoy the idea of the zoo containing reminders of how our past society was. And how much we’ve learned about animals since then.

(via San Francisco Zoo | n j w v)

bremser:

Atget, Charles Meryon & Rue des Chantres
After writing about Atget, Kertész and Google’s photographs of a small street last year, I was in Paris and made a detour to the center to see what is happening at the Rue des Chantres. I shot the above photo trying to approximate the Atget, but I use a Rolleiflex, and did not crop the square to match Atget’s ratio.

Searching for more history of Rue des Chantres, I came across this etching by Charles Meryon, 60 years before Atget’s photograph. The photograph of Rue des Chantres seems to be a direct quotation of the Meryon. The photograph and sketch are taken from the top of stairs, and Atget’s use of tripod would have limited where he would/could set up the camera. Meryon’s etching features an interesting moment, which seems to be a group of men, with a few soldiers. A woman and her child walk around them to avoid what seems to be a fight.
Meryon was a popular artist and source for photographers. Here’s some background from Marja Warehime’s book on Brassaï (bottom of page 49), where it’s mentioned Meryon would sometimes base his work on daguerreotypes. While using different mediums, Meryon and Atget were in the same line of work, documenting architecture and scenes around Paris.
In the Kertész photo, you glimpse inside a tiny bar where people are huddled, drinking during the day, below the sign documenting the flood of 1910 (“CRUE”). A bar in a medieval-sized alley is bound to give an American those feelings Americans have about European street life, but nooks like this are now filled in with million euro pied-à-terres; the area around Notre Dame is a permanent Martin Parr zone.

bremser:

Atget, Charles Meryon & Rue des Chantres

After writing about Atget, Kertész and Google’s photographs of a small street last year, I was in Paris and made a detour to the center to see what is happening at the Rue des Chantres. I shot the above photo trying to approximate the Atget, but I use a Rolleiflex, and did not crop the square to match Atget’s ratio.

image

Searching for more history of Rue des Chantres, I came across this etching by Charles Meryon, 60 years before Atget’s photograph. The photograph of Rue des Chantres seems to be a direct quotation of the Meryon. The photograph and sketch are taken from the top of stairs, and Atget’s use of tripod would have limited where he would/could set up the camera. Meryon’s etching features an interesting moment, which seems to be a group of men, with a few soldiers. A woman and her child walk around them to avoid what seems to be a fight.

Meryon was a popular artist and source for photographers. Here’s some background from Marja Warehime’s book on Brassaï (bottom of page 49), where it’s mentioned Meryon would sometimes base his work on daguerreotypes. While using different mediums, Meryon and Atget were in the same line of work, documenting architecture and scenes around Paris.

In the Kertész photo, you glimpse inside a tiny bar where people are huddled, drinking during the day, below the sign documenting the flood of 1910 (“CRUE”). A bar in a medieval-sized alley is bound to give an American those feelings Americans have about European street life, but nooks like this are now filled in with million euro pied-à-terres; the area around Notre Dame is a permanent Martin Parr zone.

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
Internet Drawing GameJenny Odell1. Make a drawing, take a screenshot, and drag it into the Google Image search bar.2. Take the first image that the Google Image search brings up (“visually similar images”), and draw it.3. Take a screenshot, and drag it into the Google Image search bar.4. Repeat ad infinitum.

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:

Internet Drawing Game
Jenny Odell

1. Make a drawing, take a screenshot, and drag it into the Google Image search bar.
2. Take the first image that the Google Image search brings up (“visually similar images”), and draw it.
3. Take a screenshot, and drag it into the Google Image search bar.
4. Repeat ad infinitum.

(Source: studioghifli)

(Source: studioghibligifs)

(Source: wesdelval)